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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the washington mall to hear reverend martin luther king jr. deliver his "i have a dream" speech. to join me to reflect on it is elizabeth alexander, professor of african-american studies at yale university. it's lovely to have you hear. >> it's great to be with you. >> we have been talking politics. i feel like one of the things the president suggested at the first inauguration was to bring a certain arts and cultural insensitivity and expression to his presidency. as you have watched the first term, what has it felt like to you as it occur snd. >> it's been thrilling. the inauguration was a template. different poetry, aretha franklin. the diversity of forms in which american excellence expresses itself. we have seen the wonderful concerts they have done at the white house. the paul simon singing stevie wonder songs, tony bennett singing stevie wonder. poetry, all these programs televised for everyone to see. the best kind of family viewing saying families should gather together and receive the arts as a gift, if you will. we have seen the arts initiative that recognizes in schools that exc
to honor the legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr., by volunteering in their own communities. right now, nearly 100 nonprofit organizations are holding a service fair on the national mall. one of them is points of light, an organization that aims to inspire, equip and mobilize people to take action that changes the world. with me today is deloris morton, she is part of the points of light program -- in fact, she is president of the points of light programs division. thank you for being here. >> thank you for having us. >> and you're a louisianan. >> i am. bayou girl. >> which i love. tell me a little bit about the fundamental philosophy that is points of light. >> points of light is the world's largest organization that's dedicated to volunteer service. all over the country today and throughout the year, we engage millions of people in volunteer service with an opportunity to first experience service, knowing that it can be transformational. it's not just about what you give to somebody else but what you get yourself. >> let's talking about the transformational part. sometimes when we t
heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! >>> this past monday, martin luther king day doubled as inauguration day. reportedly 1 million people formed a national crowd on the national mall. 55% of the crowd from 2009. still, the largest crowd ever for a second inaugural. at least one of the attendees was henry march. maybe there were others on hand, but this is a story about one henry marsh, a virginia state senator. one of 20 democrats in the virginia assembly. like wise, 20 republicans in the same body so, an even split until state senator marsh was absent on monday, attending the inauguration. thus, by a 20 to 19 vote, republicans passed a revised gerrymandered district map to go into effect on 2015, the year of the next state senate's election. they claim the map would create a majority black district. the 25th district, a democratic stronghold that includes my old backyard of charlottesville, virginia is one seat this plan could eliminate. given the republicans adjourned that session at 4:10 p.m. in memory of general stonewall jackson, i'm sure racial sensitivity wasn't hi
a marble structure. >> and martin luther king, and mary anderson and that sort of thing, but it was strategic rather than principled in some really critical ways, and that is why it is the rebellious states and not the border states. >> yes, absolutely it was strategic, but one of the things that is important is from the very beginning as a senatorial candidate, as a presidential candidate, lincoln was in fact committed to the end of slavery as a principled matter and made it very clear that his personal aversion to the institution of slavery as a kind of abomination to the world, and to what democracy and liberty stood for was not his constitutional mandate or his political one. and the complications of strategy have to do with saving the union and preserving the union to the point of a military victo victory. so it gets really complicated, and in some ways it is understandable why there is so much misinformation. >> well, if you were one of the 1.2 million-plus human beings caught in the intergenerational chattel bondage, the motivations of lincoln are probably less im
detail. what we find up until the 1970s is a clear endorsement by martin luther king and everyone in the movement. >> as you put on, this is a path that goes way back, right? we might be able to say, look, we would be a better and safer country if there's no second amendment. we might be able to say it's not part of our tradition, but it's not where we are. we are in a place where wherever gun control legislation we are going to implement and institute is in this context. talk about civically responsible gun control legislation at the time we talk about the second amendment. >> here is the crazy thing. this is not a partisan political debate in the discourse of america. 92% of americans support things like background checks to keep guns out of the hands of criminals, felons, abusers, dangerously mentally ill. that has nothing to do with the second amendment right. 74% of nra members support criminal background checks. the only place where this is a heated partisan debate is in the halls of congress and sometimes, in the media when they pit two extreme sides against each other. it'
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)